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Some sellers – often, those working without an agent – want to sell their home “as is” so they don’t have to invest money fixing it up or take on any potential liability for defects.  There is nothing wrong with buying a home “as is,” particularly if you can buy it at a favorable price, but if you are considering buying an “as is” home, you should still hire a competent home inspector to perform an inspection.  There are several reasons for this. Why Get a Home Inspection If You’re Buying “As Is”?

First, you don’t know what “as is” is. Sure, you can walk through the home and get an idea of its general condition.  You may even spot some defects or items in obvious need of repair.  But you won’t obtain the same detailed information you will receive if you hire a home inspector.  Home inspectors are trained to look for things you are not likely to notice.  Signature Home Inspection inspectors, for example, follow InterNACHI’s Residential Standards of Practice and check the roof, exterior, interior, foundation, basement, fireplace, attic, insulation, ventilation, doors, windows, heating system, cooling system, plumbing system, and electrical system for certain defects.  Armed with a home inspector’s detailed report, you will have a better idea of what “as is” means regarding that home, which means you’ll be in a better position to know whether you want to buy it.  You may also be able to use information from the home inspection to negotiate a lower price.

Why Get a Home Inspection If You’re Buying “As Is”?

Second, many states require the seller to provide you with written a disclosure about the condition of the property.  Sellers often provide little information, and a few even lie.  A home inspection can provide the missing information. If an inspector finds evidence that a seller concealed information or lied to you, that may be a sign that you don’t want to buy a home from that seller.

Finally, if you buy a home “as is” without hiring a home inspector and then later discover a defect, all is not lost.  A home inspector may be able to review the seller’s disclosure and testify as to what the seller knew or should have known about.  The inspector may find evidence that the seller made misrepresentations or concealed relevant information from you.  Even the seller of an “as is” home may be held liable for misrepresentation or concealment.

So why get a home inspection? The better choice, obviously, is to hire a home inspector first.  Remember:  The cost of a home inspection is a pittance compared to the price of the home.  Be an informed consumer, especially when buying an “as is” home, and hire Signature Home Inspection.

Southern California Gas Company has been promoting their 811 phone service. Property owners can now dial “811″ to check the location of gas pipelines prior to construction.Know before you dig 811

From the Gas Co. Website: “Pipelines may be located anywhere, including under streets, sidewalks and private property, sometimes just inches below the surface. Excavation, planting, demolition and other forms of digging are a major cause of pipeline damage. That’s why it is important to know where they are before you begin any type of digging.

Whether you’re planning to build a major development or just landscaping your yard, protect your safety and the safety of those around you by calling Underground Service Alert at 811, at least two business days prior to excavating. You may call Underground Service Alert between 6:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (excluding holidays).

Underground Service Alert will coordinate with Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) and other utility owners in the area to mark the locations of buried utility-owned lines. This is a FREE service and it can help prevent injury, costly property damage and loss of utility service.”

What to Do

  • MARK OUT out your proposed excavation area in white paint or provide other suitable markings.
  • CALL Underground Service Alert at 811 from 6a.m. to 7p.m. Monday through Friday (excluding holidays) at least two business days before digging.
  • WAIT until SoCalGas either marks its gas pipelines and indicates pipe material and diameter – or advises you the area is clear of its pipes before you start digging.
  • REMEMBER that SoCalGas uses only yellow paint, flags or stakes to mark out the location of its gas pipes. Other utility owners use other colors to mark their telephone, communications, water or other underground lines.
  • USE ONLY HAND TOOLS within 24 inches of each marked utility line to carefully expose the exact locations of all lines before using any power excavation equipment in the area.
  • REPORT any pipe damage by calling us immediately at 1-800-427-2200No damage is too small to report. Even a slight gouge, scrape or dent to a pipeline, its coating, or any component attached to or running along side the pipe, such as a wire, may cause a dangerous break or leak in the future.